Skip to content

Pears Poached with Cardamom & Saffron and Set Yoghurt Pudding

January 27, 2013

IMG_0612

I wanted to cook the Roasted Chicken with Clementines & Fennel again tonight with Jonathan and Lyndsey coming for supper so I decided it was a good idea to look in Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem book for a dessert too. I ended up combining two recipes: a set yoghurt pudding – a kind of yogurt cotto instead of panna cotta – and serving it not with poached peaches, as Ottolenghi does in the book, but the Poached Pears in White Wine & Cardamom in the preceding recipe. Both need some advance preparation and a few hours to set the cream and cool the pears. But having things ready in advance when entertaining is always good and makes for a more relaxed meal.

I prepared the set yoghurt first as that needed some time in the fridge to set.

IMG_0590IMG_0593IMG_0592

Put 4 sheets of gelatine leaves (* see note at end – add just 3) in a bowl and cover with water. Pour 200ml double cream and 200ml whole milk into a saucepan with 90g caster sugar, half a vanilla pod (split and scrape out  seeds and add seeds and pod shell), and the zest of half a lemon (Ottolenghi uses an orange but as I was serving this with pears rather than peaches I decided lemon would be a nice flavouring). Bring to a simmer on a medium heat and take off the heat immediately a simmer is reached and you see little bubbles around the edge. Remove the vanilla pod.

IMG_0595IMG_0596IMG_0597

Spoon 200ml Greek yoghurt into a bowl. Do use real Greek yoghurt, in other words, Total. Don’t use ‘Greek style’ yoghurt – it’s not the same. Slowly pour in the hot cream mixture, whisking all the time to mix with the yoghurt until smooth. Now squeeze the water from the gelatine leaves and add to the cream and yoghurt. Whisk until the gelatine completely dissolves in the warm cream.

IMG_0598IMG_0599

Very, very lightly grease 4 ramekins or small pudding moulds (150ml/6 fl.oz. size was perfect) with a light oil – I used light olive oil. This will help when you’re trying to get them out for serving. Now ladle the cream and yoghurt mixture into the moulds and put in the fridge for at least 5 hours.

Now prepare the pears:

IMG_0586IMG_0585IMG_0589

Peel 4 pears – I used comice. You want them to be firm, not ripe and soft. In a pan a size that the pears will just fit into, pour 150ml dry white wine (I have at this point to admit I misread the recipe in my turning back and forth to the next page and as I type this I see I was supposed to add 500ml … but I didn’t, I added 150ml), 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice, 150g caster sugar, 15 cardamom seeds, crushed; 1/2 teaspoon saffron threads and a pinch of salt. Bring to a simmer and place pears into the liquid. If they’re not covered, add some water. Now cook gently for about 15-25 minutes until cooked through but not falling apart; still whole. Check with a sharp knife that they’re cooked through to the centre.

IMG_0602IMG_0606

Remove the pears with a slotted spoon to a dish then boil the remaining syrup hard till it reduces by half to two-thirds. Pour over the pears and leave to cool, either at room temperature or in the fridge.

When ready to serve, lift one pear onto a plate. I cut it in half and slid the halves slightly apart. Run a sharp knife round the edge of the set creams, dip the mould in a bowl of boiling water very briefly, give it a shake and then turn over onto the plate. Now spoon some of the syrup over the pears and round the cream. Sprinkle over some roasted almond slivers.

IMG_0612

We all loved it. Jonathan said he preferred the yoghurt-based panna cotta to the normal one; it’s not quite so rich. The cardamom gives the pears an aromatic sweetness that combines wonderfully with the slightly bitter, earthy saffron. Being in a syrup, the pears are quite sweet and so the set yoghurt makes a perfect accompaniment with its slightly sharper flavour than normal panna cotta cutting through the sweetness of the poached pears. It was definitely a hit!

Note: When I next made this set yogurt – panna cotta – I used just 3 sheets of gelatine and it worked much better, still holding together in a set but much softer and creamier. See Vanilla Panna Cotta with Baked Plums.

9 Comments
  1. petit4chocolatier permalink

    I love your recipes. They are always unique, interesting, and elegantly delicious. I have never attempted poached pears. This looks delicious 🙂

    • Thank you, Judy, that’s very kind. I’m glad you enjoy the recipes. Poached pears are one of my son’s favourite desserts so I love to do them for him sometimes. There’s a more Italian version on the blog too (Oct ’11) with marsala.

  2. i love this recipe, yoghurt is a favourite summer or winter. can’t wait to try.. just wondering, do you need gelatin to set the yoghurt, I make homemade yoghurt & dont add gelatin.. thanks for a terrific recipe to combine yoghurt & pears…

    • Thank you for your comment. I’m glad you like this recipe. I didn’t make the yoghurt … I bought some real Greek – Total – yoghurt. But the recipe is for a yogurt-based panna cotta – a cooked, set cream, a bit like a jelly – so it needs the gelatine to ‘set’ it. However, I did think there was too much gelatine in the recipe so tried it again last night and a new, revised version will appear on the blog later today!

  3. Hello Kay, Excellent recipes and stories! I was looking for a great poached pear recipe and found one for yogurt pudding as well.
    Thank you for visiting my blog so I can trace back to your fantastic, informative blog. 😀 Fae.

    • Hi Fae, thank you for your kind compliments and following my blog. I love the name of your blog and the blog certainly lives up to the great name. I look forward to more of your posts. Kay

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Vanilla Panna Cotta with Baked Plums « thesinglegourmetandtraveller
  2. Honey Panna Cotta with Red Gooseberry Compote | thesinglegourmetandtraveller
  3. When It Comes to Greek Yogurt … It Has To Be Total | thesinglegourmetandtraveller

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: